12 mistakes to avoid if you’re a disaster traveling alone

by Laura Vilaça

I am a disaster traveling alone. I’ve been avoiding this confirmation because of my self esteem as an independent-grow-modern-woman, but facts keep proving me otherwise. Not even a year ago, I ‘forgot’ my checked luggage at the airport and happily went all the way home, only to realize – three hours later – that I had to go back 30 mins by bus to get it. It was a big red suitcase, almost my size. I kid you not.

76 x 31 x 43 cm. Sadly enough, not a sexual reference.

76 x 31 x 43 cm. Sadly enough, not a sexual reference.

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Stop. Calling. Me. A. Hipster.

by Laura Vilaça

I warn you that this post, though based on rational argumentation, is rather drawn from accumulated anger. I’ve been called a hipster way too many times, and it’s time to do something about it.

So why does it bother me so much to be called such a thing? “Duh, because that means you really are one of them, hipsters never admit they’re hipsters, bla bla bla”. NO. NO. NO. Contrary to popular belief, when I try to distance myself from this definition, I’m not doing it out of modern irony or contradictory behavior. Surprisingly enough, I’m trying to say that I’m not… a fucking hipster.

jesus

(take a song for the road, kids)

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I wish I had better legs

by Laura Vilaça

I wish I had better legs. In today’s job market, having good, skillful legs seems like the key to achieve financial success and social status. Yes, I’m talking about playing football and the amazing figures the players mount up just for the simple fact that they can dribble a football and have good game strategy. At 25, Messi is worth 120.000.000€ in the football market, followed by Cristiano Ronaldo (28), worthing 100.000.000€, and Andrés Iniesta (29), 70.000.000€. In a Dragon Ball world, if these boys were to fuse, they would create a super-star football player with a weird body height and, most importantly, a 300 million euro tag attached as accessory.

You can't touch this.

You can’t touch this.

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Giving back ‘demos’ to democracy

 by Laura Vilaça

I should start by stating that I am one of the fiercest critics of my generation. I believe we have been too spoiled and that this is now taking a toll in the socio-cultural evolution(?) of our countries; we were fed dreams of greatness and easy money and, stupidly enough, we still believe them. It’s a generation that, as the band Deolinda puts it when referring to internships and precarious jobs, “has to study to become a slave”.

However, a recent article on the “post-1980s Generation” got me thinking. With all this time wasted on trying to define what “we” are, more relevant debates are being neglected or left out entirely. “We”, as the present generation, are offered an incredible, historical opportunity: the opportunity to significantly change things. And I’m not referring to changing the world in a 16-and-pregnant-naïve kind of way; I am referring to the remarkable power that a mass group of people has.

The group I’m specially reporting on is the “post-1980s Generation”, born after the major world conflicts and into a world thriving with economic prosperity (in the Western side, at least). This generation is more educated than any ever was, relatively well travelled and with a defiant, rebellious spirit brewed from years of amorphous politics. In Europe, these traits cross borders, as we are more than ever bound by our common struggles and anxieties, not being able to imagine life without a common currency or open borders. Though many criticize the European Union and its policies, seldom one can find a youngster that would give up the perks of being within the EU for a more domestic existence. 

EU

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Send in the clowns

by Laura Vilaça

Employed with proper timing, being called a clown is offensive. I think we can all agree on that much. While literally meaning “a comic entertainer, especially one in a circus, wearing a traditional costume and exaggerated makeup”, calling someone a clown with the intent of offending falls into the notion of being a “silly, foolish or incompetent person” (New Oxford American Dictionary).

Since Friday, Portugal has been deeply reconnecting with this concept after a well-known writer, journalist and political analyst, Miguel Sousa Tavares, called our President of the Republic (PR), Aníbal Cavaco Silva, a “clown”. Mr. Tavares stated on an interview to the biggest national economic paper that the country doesn’t need a Beppe Grillo, because “we already have a clown. He’s called Cavaco Silva”.

Courtesy of wehavekaosinthegarden.blogspot.com

Courtesy of wehavekaosinthegarden.blogspot.com

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