Could you give me a job…please?

By Jasmijn de Baan

As a Recruiter, it is the most asked question from anyone who has just received their hard-earned diploma.

Like so many others, I started my education five years ago with all the gleam and pride of someone who thought they were getting the best start in life. Cause not everyone makes it up to university. And at that time it was literally said: ‘no matter what field of study you choose, you will have a job within a short period of time’. Five years later, the unemployment plague is a stark reality. Starter positions are relatively scarce, and the jobs available are usually met by hundreds of candidates applying (300 to 400 candidates for one job opening is rather a rule than an exception). The competition is murderous and (sadly), you can expect your group of competitors growing every half year. Unless you are in IT of course.

dream-job-1

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How about some extra endorphins?

by Michael Seckler

“From a biochemical perspective happiness is nothing more than the release of endorphins in the brain. Love, music, a nice sculpture or chocolate can cause that, but also complex mathematical constructs”. If math professor Christian Hesse was telling the truth in his interview with good impact magazine we seem to miss out on loads of endorphins all the time. Noort Bakx showed it with dating the other day: There is more math in your everyday-life than you might expect. You don’t think so? Maybe a look at this extremely average Wednesday of mine can convince you of the contrary (Do I already sound like the math teacher you hated? Good!): 

The Travelling-Salesman-Problem (Picture: dogonews.com)

The Travelling-Salesman-Problem (Picture: dogonews.com)

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Word of the year 2013: a reflection of the “me-me-me” generation

by Alix Barré

This week the Oxford Dictionary’s word of the year 2013 came out and it was…drum roll…selfie! The word beat seven other ones that had made the shortlist for this year, beating words such as Twerk (thankfully), showrooming, bitcoin and bedroom tax. In order to qualify as the word of the year, the Oxford Dictionary requires it, “to reflect the ethos, mood, or preoccupations of that particular year and to have lasting potential as a word of cultural significance.” With that in mind it can make you wonder how a word such as selfie could become the word that reflects the preoccupations of our culture the most.

credit: AP

credit: AP

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Mathematical dating

By Noort Bakx

There are more than 7 billion people in the world. Half of those are male, and about 1/7 of them my age. Meaning a bunch of about 500.000.000 is left. Start finding Mister Right. Continuing with numbers, say you can meet about 50.000 in a lifetime, you need to live 10.000 lives to meet every single one of them, and consequently, be sure there is no better one out there. Apparently, a classical mathematical problem that can be solved with a simple formula.

Michael Tompsett – Fine Art America

Michael Tompsett – Fine Art America

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Let’s Make Time for Games

by Daniel Isler

“Learning, according to that almost automatic view, is what children do in school and, maybe, in other adult-directed activities. Playing is, at best, a refreshing break from learning. From that view, summer vacation is just a long recess, perhaps longer than necessary. But here’s an alternative view, which should be obvious but apparently is not: playing is learning. At play, children learn the most important of life’s lessons, the ones that cannot be taught in school. To learn these lessons well, children need lots of play — lots and lots of it, without interference from adults.” (Peter Grey)

Do you feel sometimes that people around you – at work, at school, on the bus or on the internet – are being schematic and predictable, contributing nothing to a given conversation but a chewed-up set of ideas? The world is getting rapidly more full of adults that are incapable of creative thinking that creates new knowledge by building on existing knowledge. A few weeks ago I wrote here about Sir Ken Robinson and his notions of how schools kill creativity. What are the alternatives that the modern education system can provide in order to overcome these problems?

Telramen_op_de_bank_in_de_klas_Counting-frames_in_classroom[1]

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